The Fund for Investigative Journalism

Supporting investigative reporting projects around the world

  • Next Application Deadline

    Monday May 11, 2015 - 5pm Eastern time
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    Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation Supports Investigative Reporting

    March 17th, 2015

    (Washington) – The Fund for Investigative Journalism is proud to announce that the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation has renewed its support of the Fund’s grant-making program. The $100,000 donation from the Foundation will underwrite grants to independent reporters who have leads, ideas, and expertise, but need help paying the expenses of reporting.

    The Oklahoma City-based foundation has been a proud supporter of the Fund for many years, and more recently has aided the growth of many investigative reporting centers formed to serve urban and regional “news deserts” where metropolitan newspapers and broadcast stations once had robust, prize-winning investigative reporting teams.

    The financial assistance from the Fund – along with mentors recruited through partnerships with Investigative Reporters and Editors and with the Society of Environmental Journalists – helps independent investigative journalism thrive in an era of shrinking staffs and diminished newsroom resources.

    The Fund is grateful to the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation for its continued support of a grant-making program for freelancers, who bring local investigative news to communities throughout the United States.

    Application Deadlines

    March 12th, 2015

    Application deadlines for the next three grant cycles are as following:

    Monday, May 11, 2015, at 5pm Eastern Time.

    Monday, September 21, 2015, at 5pm Eastern Time.

    Monday, February 1, 2016 at 5pm Eastern Time.

    Grants Awarded

    February 23rd, 2015

    The Fund for Investigative Journalism has awarded $69,000 in grants to support journalists working on 17 projects in the United States and around the world. The journalists are investigating abuse of power by public officials and powerful private institutions. Since 1969, FIJ has supported independent investigative reporters with grants that cover the cost of reporting, such as travel, document fees, and equipment rental. Recently FIJ has begun to award small stipends as part of the overall grant. A typical grant is $5,000.

    The following reporters received FIJ awards:

    Badruddoza Babu, Bangladesh based broadcast reporter

    Jeanne Baron, New York City based human rights reporter

    Tony Bartelme, book author

    Sandra Bartlett, Toronto-based investigative reporter.

    Marianna Grigoryan, Yerevan based investigative reporter and editor

    Stephanie Guyer-Stevens, California based reporter

    Adu Koranteng, Ghana-based investigative reporter

    Margaret Lucas, associate publisher, Oakland Local

    Carlos Mendoza, economic specializing in violence analysis

    Annie Murphy, journalist and radio producer currently based in Maine

    Francisco Rodriguez, political scientist and journalist at elPeriodico, Guatemala

    Elizabeth Shogren, independent reporter based in Washington DC area

    Dylan Smith, TucsonSentinel.com

    Santiago Villa, Beijing-based multi-media investigative journalist

    Zvezdana Vukojevic, investigative reporter

    Adam Wisnieski, Bronx-based investigative reporter

    Stephanie Woodard, for Indian Country Today Media Network

     

     

     

     

    Investigative Freelancer Survey Released

    February 17th, 2015

    Project Word has released a groundbreaking survey of investigative freelance reporters, called “Untold Stories.” Major finding: freelancers say they are forced to drop many investigative stories each year for lack of financial resources. Interested in the feedback the survey would produce, The Fund for Investigative Journalism helped out by notifying its grantees of the opportunity to participate.

    Deadline Extended to February 2

    January 6th, 2015

    (Washington) The January 15, 2015 deadline for applications has been extended to Monday, February 2, 2015 at 5pm Eastern time. The Fund for Investigative Journalism is currently accepting applications for domestic and foreign investigations.

    Deadline Extended

    December 19th, 2014

    (Washington) The Fund for Investigative Journalism has extended its grant proposal deadline to Monday, February 2, 2015 – 5pm Washington DC time (EST).

    The typical grant is $5,000. Qualified grant expenses include out-of-pocket costs such as travel, document production and equipment rental. Small stipends may be considered as a part of the grant. FIJ is currently accepting proposals for domestic and overseas investigations.

    Visit the FIJ website for detailed instructions and on-line application form: http://fij.org/grant-application/. FIJ welcomes calls and emails with questions about the application process. Email email hidden; JavaScript is required or call 202-662-7564.

    Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation Awards Grant For Investigative Reporting

    December 11th, 2014

    (Washington) – The Fund for Investigative Journalism is pleased to announce The Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation has awarded a two-year $60,000 grant to support the Fund’s grant-making program.

    The general operating grant underwrites the Fund’s program for independent reporters who have the ideas, sources, and know-how to produce groundbreaking investigative journalism, but need help paying the expenses of reporting.

    The support will also help the Fund conduct a mentoring program in partnership with Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE) and the Society of Environmental Journalists (SEJ), which recruit veteran journalists to mentor grantees over the duration of their projects.

    The Fund for Investigative Journalism has supported hundreds of investigative reporting projects since 1969, when it paid Seymour Hersh’s travel expenses to help him check out a tip that civilians had been massacred by American soldiers in My Lai, Vietnam.

    The Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation, based in Baltimore, supports nonprofits active in the fields of education, health care, human rights, and social justice.

    In addition to support from The Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation, the Fund for Investigative Journalism receives foundation support from The Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, The Reva and David Logan Foundation, The Park Foundation, The Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation, The Gannett Foundation, The Green Park Foundation, The Nara Fund, and from individual donors, many of them referred by the Catalogue for Philanthropy: Greater Washington.

    Pro bono legal services are provided by Dykema Gossett PLLC, a national commercial law firm with a broad portfolio of community service and pro bono clients.

    Pro bono business advisory services are provided by Leigh Riddick, Associate Professor of Finance at The American University’s Kogod School of Business.

    Donations for the Fund’s grant-making program can be made online, www.fij.org, or by mail to the Fund for Investigative Journalism, 529 14th Street NW – 13th floor, Washington DC 20045.

    The Fund is currently accepting grant applications for foreign and domestic investigations. The next deadline is January 15, 2015 – 5pm EST.

    “Private Violence” Airs Tonight on HBO

    October 20th, 2014

    The Fund for Investigative Journalism is one of the proud sponsors of “Private Violence,” a documentary praised in today’s New York Times for illuminating the “entrenched” problem of domestic violence in “shocking clarity.” Quoting from the review: “[the film’s] objective is to change the presumptions so that victims are not fighting an uphill battle from the beginning.”

    Private Violence airs tonight at 9pm on HBO.

     

    Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation Renews Support

    October 3rd, 2014

    (Washington) – The Fund for Investigative Journalism is pleased to announce The Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation has renewed its support of the Fund’s grant-making program for independent investigative reporters.

    The $25,000 in support from The Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation will underwrite grants for reporters who have the ideas, sources, and know-how to produce groundbreaking investigative journalism, but lack the resources to complete their projects.

    For more than forty years, the Fund has paid reporting expenses of journalists who produce in-depth, exclusive stories that have impact. In 1969, one of the first grants from the Fund helped freelance reporter Seymour Hersh break the story of the My Lai massacre.

    In addition to support from The Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation, the Fund receives support from The Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation, The Gannett Foundation, The Green Park Foundation, The Park Foundation, The Nara Fund, The Reva & David Logan Foundation, The Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, from private family foundations, and from individual donors, many of them referred by the Catalogue for Philanthropy: Greater Washington.

    One of the Fund for Investigative Journalism’s board members, David Ottaway, also serves on the board of the Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation.

    The Fund also offers a mentoring program for grantees, in partnership with Investigative Reporters and Editors and with the Society of Environmental Journalists – which recruit mentors from among their members.

    Pro bono legal services are provided by Dykema Gossett PLLC, a national commercial law firm with a broad portfolio of community service and pro bono clients.

    Pro bono business advisory services are provided by Leigh Riddick, Associate Professor of Finance at The American University’s Kogod School of Business.

    The Fund for Investigative Journalism makes grants three to four times each year. Potential applicants are invited to contact the office by email, email hidden; JavaScript is required, or phone, 202-662-7564, with questions about the Fund’s grant-making program and to sign up for email notifications of application deadlines.

    The Fund for Investigative Journalism relies on donations, which can be made online, www.fij.org, or by mail to the Fund for Investigative Journalism, 529 14th Street NW – 13th floor, Washington D.C. 20045.

    FIJ Awards Grants to Investigative Reporters

    August 11th, 2014

    (Washington) – The Fund for Investigative Journalism (FIJ) has awarded nearly $80,000 in grants to support journalists working on 18 projects in the United States and abroad. The journalists are investigating negligence, corruption, and abuse of power in fields such as mental health, government contracting, and criminal justice.

    Since 1969, FIJ has supported independent investigative reporters with grants that cover the cost of reporting, such as travel, document fees, equipment rental; smalls stipend are also considered as part of the overall grant. A typical grant is $5,000.

    The following reporters received FIJ awards:

    Mark Betancourt, DC-based multimedia journalist

    Mariah Blake, Mother Jones

    Adriana Cardona-Maguigad and Rafael Franco Steeves, fellows with the Social Justice News Nexus at Northwestern University

    Beth Cortez-Neavel, Austin-based multimedia and data journalist

    Allyn Gaestel, international freelance journalist

    Wanjohi Kabukuru, Kenya-based journalist

    Jeff Kelly-Lowenstein, journalist and Columbia College of Chicago journalism professor

    Jeremy Knop, Montana Center for Investigative Reporting

    Christian Locka, multi-media investigative reporter

    Claudine LoMonaco, Berlin-based freelance reporter and radio producer

    Daniel McGraw, Cleveland-based investigative reporter and author

    Caitlin McNally, documentary filmmaker

    Christopher Richard, LA-based investigative reporter

    Mark Richardson, investigative reporter specializing in government and politics

    Joseph Sorrentino, Albuquerque-based photographer and journalist, focused on the US-Mexico border region

    Loren Stein, DC-based investigative journalist

    Estacio Valoi, Mozambican investigative journalist

    WAMU-Radio investigative staff

    The Fund for Investigative Journalism is supported by The Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, The Reva and David Logan Foundation, The Park Foundation, The Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation, The Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation, The Green Park Foundation, The Gannett Foundation, The Nara Fund, and individual donors, many of them referred by the Catalogue for Philanthropy: Greater Washington.

    Pro bono legal services are provided by Dykema Gossett PLLC, a national commercial law firm with a broad portfolio of community service and pro bono clients.

    Pro bono business advisory services are provided by Leigh Riddick, Associate Professor of Finance at The American University’s Kogod School of Business.

    UPCOMING DEADLINE: FIJ is currently accepting applications for its next round of grant-making. The deadline is Monday, September 8, at 5pm Eastern time.