The Fund for Investigative Journalism

Supporting investigative reporting projects around the world

  • Next Application Deadline

    Monday, Sept. 8, 2014 - 5pm Eastern Time
  • Newsroom

    Green Park Foundation Supports Investigative Journalism

    June 9th, 2014

    Washington – The Fund for Investigative Journalism is pleased to announce The Green Park Foundation has awarded $25,000 to support the Fund’s grant-making program for independent journalists around the world.

    The Foundation grant underwrites the Fund’s program in the United States and abroad to pay expenses for independent reporters who have the ideas, sources, and know-how to produce groundbreaking investigative journalism, but need resources to get the work done.

    The Green Park Foundation’s support over the years has been responsible for enterprise reporting on climate change issues, including the investigation of an energy project in Papua New Guinea that triggered a deadly landslide – and which received US financial backing despite being at cross purposes with President Obama’s pledge to phase out fossil fuels.

    The Fund for Investigative Journalism is also supported by The Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, The Reva and David Logan Foundation, The Park Foundation, The Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation, The Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation, The Gannett Foundation, The Nara Fund, and individual donors, many of them referred by the Catalogue for Philanthropy: Greater Washington.

    Pro bono legal services are provided by Dykema Gossett PLLC, a national commercial law firm with a broad portfolio of community service and pro bono clients.

    Pro bono business advisory services are provided by Leigh Riddick, Associate Professor of Finance at The American University’s Kogod School of Business.

    The Fund makes grants three to four times a year. In the past two years, the Fund has awarded more than $400,000 in investigative reporting grants. The typical grant is around $5,000.

    The Fund relies on the support of individuals and foundations. Donations can be made online, www.fij.org, or by mail to the Fund for Investigative Journalism, 529 14th Street NW – 13th floor, Washington DC 20045.

    Award for Mental Health Investigation

    June 6th, 2014

    Stuy auditoriumRong Xiaoqing of the Chinese-language Sing Tao Daily has won a Deadline Club Award from the New York City chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, for her story: “The Dark Corner in an Elite High School – Mental Health of Successful Students Needs More Attention.” Rong’s story was a deeply reported examination of the mental health consequences for some students at the highly competitive Stuyvesant High School in Manhattan.

    Rong also placed second in the Ippies Award for investigative reporting. The award, sponsored the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism, honors work by ethnic and community media in New York. The judges’ comment: “The story showed diligent research on a sensitive and rarely examined subject.”

    FIJ Announces Grant Awards

    May 1st, 2014

    (Washington)

    The Fund for Investigative Journalism has awarded $62,700 in grants to support journalists working on 14 projects in the United States, Asia, Africa and the Caribbean. The journalists are investigating corruption, malfeasance, and abuse of power in the public and private sectors.

    Since 1969, FIJ has supported independent investigative reporters with grants that cover the cost of reporting, such as travel, document fees, and equipment rental. Recently FIJ has begun to award small stipends as part of the overall grant. A typical grant is $5,000.

    The following reporters received FIJ awards:

    Jason Berry, author and freelance journalist

    Roddy Boyd, financial investigative reporter

    Steve Brenner, sports journalist

    Maurice Chammah, Juvenile Justice Information Exchange

    Ezra Fieser, foreign correspondent based in the Dominican Republic

    Celeste Fremon, LA-based writer and editor

    Joseph Mazige, Kampala-based investigative reporter

    Moises Mendoza, Shaminder Dulai, Urs Spindler, and Jason Witmer – based in the US and Germany

    Vivekananda Nemana and Ankita Rao, American multimedia journalists based in Hyderabad, India

    Christopher Pala, Washington DC-based investigative reporter

    Kate Pastor, Bronx-based journalist

    Alisa Roth, editor, Life of the Law

    Khadija Sharife, Africa-based writer

    Laird Townsend, director of Project Word

    The Fund for Investigative Journalism is supported by The Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, The Reva and David Logan Foundation, The Park Foundation, The Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation, The Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation, The Green Park Foundation, The Gannett Foundation, The Nara Fund, and individual donors, many of them referred by the Catalogue for Philanthropy: Greater Washington.

    Pro bono legal services are provided by Dykema Gossett PLLC, a national commercial law firm with a broad portfolio of community service and pro bono clients.

    Pro bono business advisory services are provided by Leigh Riddick, Associate Professor of Finance at The American University’s Kogod School of Business.

    UPCOMING DEADLINE: FIJ is currently accepting applications for its next round of grant-making. The deadline is Monday, May 5, at 5pm Eastern time.

    FIJ makes grants three to four times a year.

    Application Deadline Approaching

    April 23rd, 2014

    (Washington) Reminder: the May 5, 2014 deadline is approaching to submit a grant application to the Fund for Investigative Journalism (FIJ).

    Grants cover expenses such as travel, document production and equipment rental. Small stipends may be considered as a part of the grant. The typical grant is $5,000.

    The Board of Directors looks for stories that break new ground and expose wrongdoing in the public or private sectors. FIJ accepts applications for both domestic and foreign investigations.

    Visit the FIJ website for detailed instructions and the on-line application form: http://fij.org/grant-application/.

    Apply by May 5, at 5pm Eastern time to be considered for this round of funding. FIJ makes grants three or four times a year.

    Email email hidden; JavaScript is required if you have questions about the application process.

    Kogod Professor Advises FIJ

    April 4th, 2014

    Riddick_LeighAmerican University Kogod School of Business magazine, Kogod Now, profiles associate professor Leigh Riddick, who provides pro bono business and finance advice to the Fund for Investigative Journalism.

    An excerpt from the profile:

    Sustaining a news organization is no easy feat. Riddick knows this firsthand. Her grandfather, James Bland, bought the Times-Dispatch [in Arkansas] in 1921. She worked for her grandfather and later her uncle (James Jr.) in the summers and after school. She covered trials, weddings, obituaries—and [the occasional] scandal. Her cousin John Bland runs the newspaper now….

    Like the Times-Dispatch, the FIJ contributes to the public good in a way Riddick admires.

    “I’ve been impressed with the level of organization and detail,” she said. “[They are] very frugal, clearly saving the money to put into grants.”

    Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation Renews Support

    March 26th, 2014

    (Washington) – The Fund for Investigative Journalism is proud to announce that the Oklahoma City – based Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation has renewed its support for the Fund’s grant-making program.

    The Foundation has combined a $75,000 grant with a Challenge Grant to support the Fund’s assistance to investigative reporters who have tips, sources, and know-how, but need resources to cover the expenses of reporting.

    The Foundation is committed to supporting new and innovative investigative newsrooms, while challenging nonprofit journalists to grow and sustain their work by identifying new sources of revenue.

    The grant from Ethics and Excellence challenges the Fund for Investigative Journalism to raise $25,000 in new and increased sources of revenue by early next year. If the fundraising deadline is met, the Foundation will increase its annual support of the Fund for Investigative Journalism to $100,000.

    Please help us meet our Challenge Grant goals.

    You can make a donation to the Fund online, http://fij.org/donate/, or by mail to the Fund for Investigative Journalism, 529 14th Street NW – 13th floor, Washington DC 20045.

    The Fund for Investigative Journalism is grateful for the support it receives from The Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, The Reva and David Logan Foundation, The Park Foundation, The Green Park Foundation, The Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation, The Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation, The Gannett Foundation, The Nara Fund, and individual donors, many of them referred by the Catalogue for Philanthropy: Greater Washington.

    Pro bono legal services are provided by Dykema Gossett PLLC, a national commercial law firm with a broad portfolio of community service and pro bono clients.

    Pro bono business advisory services are provided by Leigh Riddick, Associate Professor of Finance at The American University’s Kogod School of Business.

    The Fund is currently accepting grant applications for investigative reporting projects. The next deadline is Monday May 5 at 5pm Eastern time.

    FIJ-Supported Author Wins “Izzy” Award

    March 18th, 2014

    Kill Anything That Moves

    Author Nick Turse, who wrote Kill Anything that Moves with support from the Fund for Investigative Journalism, has shared in the 2014 I.F. Stone “Izzy” Award for his relentless investigations into civilian war deaths. The Award was established by the Park Center for Independent Media at Ithaca College.

    The award citation for Turse:

    In news pieces and a book published last year, Turse has given human form and voice to civilian victims of U.S. wars from Vietnam to Afghanistan. His acclaimed best-seller, “Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam,” relied on classified Pentagon documents and fresh first-person interviews to reveal that violence against Vietnamese noncombatants was “pervasive and systematic — the predictable result of official orders.” A journalist, historian and Nation Institute fellow, he monitors current U.S. military interventionism in articles for TomDispatch.com (where he is managing editor) and The Nation, for which he coauthored the special report “America’s Afghan Victims.”

    Said Izzy judge Robert McChesney, “Nick Turse combines the fastidiousness of a serious historian and a journalist’s intuition for the big story, along with an uncompromising commitment to the truth, wherever it leads.”

    Boardman Elected to FIJ Board

    March 17th, 2014

    (Washington DC) – The Fund for Investigative Journalism announced today that David Boardman, dean of Temple University’s School of Media and Communication, has been elected to its Board of Directors.

    Previously, Boardman was executive editor of the Seattle Times, which he led to four Pulitzer Prizes for investigative reporting, breaking news, and national news.

    He is president of the American Society of News Editors, a member of the Steering Committee of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, a member of the Board of Directors of the California-based Center for Investigative Reporting, and a charter member of the Advisory Board of ProPublica, the national investigative journalism nonprofit. He also serves on the board of the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project, based in Sarajevo, Bosnia.

    Boardman has also served as president of Investigative Reporters and Editors, a national professional development and membership organization of investigative reporters.

    He joins a board that also recently elected members Marcia Bullard, former President and Chief Executive Officer of USA WEEKEND, and Milton Coleman, retired Senior Editor of the Washington Post.

    Ricardo Sandoval-Palos, president of The Fund for Investigative Journalism’s board, praised Boardman for his contributions to journalism.

    “For decades David has been a source of inspiration for journalists who favor the deeper story, guiding a generation of investigative reporters toward effective ways of delivering important stories to evolving audiences. David’s experience and leadership will help FIJ remain a leader in the fight to keep investigative journalism alive and relevant.”

    For more than forty years the Fund for Investigative Journalism has paid reporting expenses of reporters who have the ideas, sources, and know-how to produce groundbreaking investigative journalism but lack the resources to complete their projects.

    In the past two years, the Fund has awarded more than $400,000 in investigative reporting grants. The typical grant is around $5,000.

    The Fund receives support from foundations and from individuals. Its foundation supporters are The Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, The Park Foundation, The Reva & David Logan Foundation, The Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation, The Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation, The Gannett Foundation, The Green Park Foundation, and The Nara Fund.

    Pro bono legal services are provided by Dykema Gossett PLLC, a national commercial law firm with a broad portfolio of community service and pro bono clients.

    Pro bono business advisory services are provided by Leigh Riddick, Associate Professor of Professor of Finance at The American University’s Kogod School of Business.

    Remembering Joel Brinkley

    March 13th, 2014

    Friends and colleagues of Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Joel Brinkley are remembering his range as a national, foreign, and investigative reporter, his lucid writing, and his sense of humor. Brinkley has died at age 61. Brinkley won a Pulitzer Prize as a young reporter for the Louisville Courier-Journal, went on to report for the New York Times for more than twenty years, write several books, and teach journalism at Stanford University. He also served as a member of the board of the Fund for Investigative Journalism from 2000 until 2005.

    You can read more about his life in the Washington Post and the New York Times.

    Call for Investigative Grant Proposals

    February 28th, 2014

    (Washington)

    The Fund for Investigative Journalism (FIJ) is calling for applications for grants to support independent investigative reporting. Grants cover out-of-pocket expenses such as travel, document production and equipment rental. Small stipends may be considered as a part of the grant. The typical grant is $5,000.

    The deadline for applications is Monday, May 5, at 5pm Eastern time.

    The Board of Directors looks for stories that break new ground and expose wrongdoing – such as corruption, malfeasance, or misuse of power - in the public and private sectors.

    Visit the FIJ website for detailed instructions and on-line application form: http://fij.org/grant-application/. FIJ welcomes calls and emails with questions about the application process. Email: email hidden; JavaScript is required. Phone: 202-662-7564.