The Fund for Investigative Journalism

Supporting investigative reporting projects around the world

  • Next Application Deadline

    Monday September 21, 2015 - 5pm Eastern time
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    FIJ Grants Awarded

    July 21st, 2015

    (Washington) – The Fund for Investigative Journalism (FIJ) has awarded $79,000 in grants to journalists working on 19 projects in the United States and around the world. With FIJ grants, journalists investigate abuse of power in the public and private sectors. The financial support helps freelancers and reporters working for nonprofit news organizations cover the necessary costs of document retrieval, travel to develop and interview sources, and rental fees for equipment used for multi-media story-telling. A typical grant is $5,000. FIJ grants may also include small stipends.

    The following reporters and organizations have been awarded grants:

    David Armstrong of Georgia News Lab, a collaborative investigative reporting initiative

    Jeffrey Benzing, criminal justice reporter for PublicSource

    Eliza Griswold, author

    Roza Hovhannisyan, an investigative journalist in Armenia

    Laura Kasinof, a freelance journalist working in East Africa and the Middle East

    Colleen Kimmett, a journalist based in Canada

    Adu Koranteng, a journalist based in Ghana

    David Krajicek, who writes about crime and justice

    Laura Krantz, a journalist based in Colorado

    Christian Locka, an investigative freelance reporter in Cameroon

    David Montero, an author who will examine health care in China

    Madeline Ostrander, Seattle–based environmental journalist

    Roman Romanovskiy, freelance journalist and analyst for Transparency International-Russia

    Joseph Sorrentino, freelance writer and photographer

    Michael Stoll, executive director and editor of the San Francisco Public Press

    Grants are awarded three to four times a year.

    The next deadline to apply for a grant is September 21, 2015.

    Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation Grant Supports Investigative Reporting

    July 20th, 2015

    (Washington) – The Fund for Investigative Journalism (FIJ) is pleased to announce that the Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation has renewed its support of FIJ’s grant-making program for a third year with a $25,000 donation.

    The Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation’s journalism program supports press freedom around the world and seeks to improve the quality of journalism through grants to American journalism schools and investigative reporting projects and websites. The Foundation also supports education, community arts, public health, and environmental projects.

    The grant made to FIJ will underwrite freelance reporters writing for American media outlets on both domestic and foreign issues.

    For more than forty years, FIJ has paid reporting expenses of reporters who have the ideas, sources, and know-how to produce groundbreaking investigative journalism but need resources to complete their projects.

    One of the Fund for Investigative Journalism’s board members, David Ottaway, also serves on the board of the Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation.

    Gannett Foundation Renews Support of Investigative Journalism

    July 16th, 2015

    (Washington) The Fund for Investigative Journalism is pleased to announce it has received $15,000 in support from the Gannett Foundation to help underwrite the Fund’s grant-making program.

    For the past five years, The Gannett Foundation has provided support for investigative reporters working with grants from the Fund. Those reporters have exposed wrongdoing and abuse of power in the United States, including stories of the callous treatment of new mothers in prison, the psychological damage caused by solitary confinement, the prevalence of returning women soldiers afflicted by PTSD, and traffic stops that target Hispanic motorists.

    The Gannett Foundation is a corporate foundation supported by the Gannett Co., Inc., owner of USA TODAY.

    For more than four decades, the Fund has paid reporting expenses of reporters who have the ideas, sources, and know-how to produce groundbreaking investigative journalism but lack the resources to complete their projects.

    The Reva and David Logan Foundation Increases Its Support for Investigative Journalism

    July 16th, 2015

    Washington – The Fund for Investigative Journalism is pleased to announce that The Reva and David Logan Foundation has awarded $85,000 to support the Fund’s grant-making program for independent journalists around the world.

    This is the third year that the Fund has received a grant from The Reva and David Logan Foundation, and represents an increased level of funding. The additional funds will be used to offer professional development opportunities to grantees of the Fund.

    The Reva and David Logan Foundation has a history of supporting high-impact investigative journalism organizations, including The Centre for Investigative Journalism in London, The Investigative Reporting Program at the University of California – Berkeley, and Reveal Radio – produced by The Center for Investigative Reporting in Berkeley.

    The Foundation also sponsors the annual Logan Symposium on Investigative Reporting at the University of California – Berkeley.

    The Fund for Investigative Journalism is an independent, nonprofit organization that has supported hundreds of public service reporting projects since 1969, when it provided travel expenses for Seymour Hersh to investigate the massacre of civilians by American soldiers in My Lai, Vietnam.

    The Fund pays expenses and small stipends for independent reporters who have the ideas, sources, and know-how to produce groundbreaking investigative journalism, but need resources to get the work done.

    The Fund makes grants three to four times a year, typically about $5,000. The next deadline for applications is September 21, 2015.

    The Fund relies on the support of individuals and foundations. Donations can be made online, www.fij.org, or by mail to the Fund for Investigative Journalism, 529 14th Street, NW, 13th floor, Washington DC 20045.

    FIJ Grantees Win Journalism Awards

    July 1st, 2015

    Journalists working with grants from the Fund for Investigative Journalism have been honored with two awards from the 2015 National Press Club Journalism Contest.

    Jeff Kelly Lowenstein, a freelance reporter for the Center for Public Integrity was honored for his series, “Understaffed and Underserved: a Look Inside America’s Nursing Homes.” He won the Joseph D. Ryle Award for Excellence in Writing on the Problems of Geriatrics. The judges commented that Lowenstein’s series “exposed how some nursing homes are significantly understaffed, have pronounced racial disparities, and yet receive financial support from the federal government to expand and build new facilities. Using sophisticated techniques of data collection and reporting, the Lowenstein series shows how the information on a government site for consumers overstates the hours nurses are available to care for patients. And it documents cases of the same nursing homes getting financial help from the federal government for refinancing and rebuilding.”

    Marcus Stern and Sebastian Jones, writing in collaboration with InsideClimate News, The Weather Channel, and The Investigative Fund, were also honored. Their series, “Boom: North America’s Explosive Oil-by-Rail Problem” won the Joan M. Friedenberg Online Journalism Award. Judges commented: “Using a combination of analytical text, insightful graphics, and compelling video, ‘Boom’ tells how the unexpected success of oil drilling in places like North Dakota is creating unanticipated demand on an antiquated railway distribution system under lax regulation. One result: catastrophic derailment accidents in unsuspecting towns, some with frighteningly epic fiery explosions caught on mobile phone video and incorporated into the multimedia presentation.

    The Lowenstein series on nursing homes was also honored with a Lisagor Award from the Chicago Headline Club for Best Non-Deadline Reporting Online.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    New Board Members Announced

    June 17th, 2015

    (Washington DC) – The Fund for Investigative Journalism announced today that three journalists recognized for excellence, innovation, and leadership in the journalism profession have been elected to its board of directors.

    The new board members are:

    • Luis Botello, senior program director – special projects, International Center for Journalists (ICFJ)
    • Clarence Page, syndicated columnist for the Chicago Tribune
    • Cheryl W. Thompson, investigative reporter for The Washington Post and associate professor of journalism at George Washington University

    Botello is responsible for developing strategies for expanding the work of the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) in key areas of media development. He conducts a variety of training programs and conferences on digital media, mobile technology, ethics, press freedom, investigative reporting and media development worldwide. Botello is a regular on-air guest commentator for Latin American news networks such as CNN En Español and NTN24. He worked for 10 years as ICFJ’s Latin American program director and launched ICFJ’s International Journalism Network (IJNet), an online media assistance news service. Botello previously served as morning newscast producer, host and television reporter for Televisora Nacional in Panama, where he covered assignments in Latin America, the United States and Europe. He is a member of the board of directors of the Knight Center for Journalism in the Americas at the University of Texas at Austin and the Latin American Journalism Center (CELAP) in Panama City, Panama.

    Page writes a column for the Chicago Tribune that is syndicated in more than 150 newspapers around the country. He won the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary in 1989. In 1972 he was a member of a Chicago Tribune task force that was awarded the Pulitzer for its investigation of vote fraud. Page frequently appears on broadcast shows such as “The McLaughlin Group” and “The Chris Matthews Show.” Page is the author of two books, “Showing My Color: Impolite Essays on Race and Identity,” and “Culture Worrier.” He is also a board member of The Herb Block Foundation and the Committee to Protect Journalists. Page had been on the Fund’s Advisory Board, and previously served for many years as a board member.

    Thompson came to The Post in 1997, and has written extensively about law enforcement, political corruption, and guns. She wrote an investigative series on firearms that tracked guns used to kill more than 500 police officers in the U.S. In 2011, she won an Emmy award for a prison interview of a Chicago man sentenced to life for killing a police officer. She was part of the team that won the 2002 Pulitzer Prize for national reporting and received two Salute to Excellence awards from the National Association of Black Journalists, including one for an investigation into the killing of a 14-year-old boy by a D.C. police officer.

    Her most recent investigation told the stories of nearly 40 witnesses to crime in the D.C. area who were killed for talking to authorities, or out of fear that they might talk. Prior to coming to The Post, Ms. Thompson was an investigative reporter for the Kansas City Star, where she broke stories on how the University of Kansas Medical Center performed no heart transplants for 10 months but continued to accept patients, place them on the waiting list and bill them. She has also been a reporter for the Champaign (IL) News-Gazette, the Gainesville (FL) Sun, the Daily News of Los Angeles and the Chicago Tribune. Thompson was recently elected to the board of Investigative Reporters and Editors.

    For more than forty years the Fund has paid reporting expenses of reporters who have the ideas, sources, and know-how to produce groundbreaking investigative journalism but lack the resources to complete their projects.

    The Fund receives support from foundations and from individuals – many of whom are referred by the Catalogue for Philanthropy: Greater Washington. Its foundation supporters are The Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, The Reva & David Logan Foundation, The Park Foundation, The Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation, The Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation, The Gannett Foundation, The Herb Block Foundation, The Green Park Foundation, and The Nara Fund.

    Pro bono legal services are provided by Dykema Gossett PLLC, a national commercial law firm with a broad portfolio of community service and pro bono clients.

    Pro bono business advisory services are provided by Leigh Riddick, Associate Professor of Finance at The American University’s Kogod School of Business.

    Fund for Investigative Journalism – Logan Fellow Announced

    June 3rd, 2015

    (Washington) Estacio Valoi, a journalist from Mozambique, will attend the Investigative Reporters and Editors (IRE) conference in Philadelphia, June 4 – 7, on an FIJ fellowship funded by The Reva and David Logan Foundation.

    Valoi was chosen as an FIJ-Logan Fellow in recognition of his investigation of elephant slaughters in Mozambique, funded by FIJ.

    IRE conferences provide professional development through workshops, panel discussions, and hands-on training seminars.

    FIJ is one of the sponsors of the 2015 IRE conference.

    IRE is a membership organization of investigative reporters, editors, professors, and students. At its annual conferences, IRE members share story ideas and practical tips. IRE’s model of peers teaching peers began with a 1976 conference and continues today with its annual June conference, computer-assisted reporting conferences, and online resources.

    Grants Awarded

    May 8th, 2015

    (Washington) – The Fund for Investigative Journalism (FIJ) has awarded $71,300 in grants to journalists working on 15 projects in the United States and around the world. With FIJ grants, journalists investigate abuse of power in the public and private sectors. The financial support helps freelancers and reporters working for nonprofit news organizations cover the necessary costs of document retrieval, travel to develop and interview sources, and rental fees for equipment used for multi-media story-telling. FIJ also pays small stipends. A typical grant is $5,000.

    The following reporters and non-profit news organizations received grants:

    Ana Arana, Mexico City-based reporter

    Ken Armstrong, Seattle-based author

    Amy Bracken, Boston-based freelance reporter and radio producer

    Olga Ceaglei, investigative reporter from the Republic of Moldova

    Steve Fisher and Anabel Hernández, fellows, the Investigative Reporting Program at UC Berkeley

    The Investigative Reporter Project of Occupy.com.

    Kay Mastenbroek, Myanmar based journalist and film maker

    Jarrett Murphy, executive editor and publisher, City Limits

    Mark Olalde, Chicago-based investigative reporter

    Camila Osorio, Colombian investigative reporter based in New York.

    Christopher Pala, free-lance journalist based in Washington, D.C., with special interest in Pacific issues

    Miranda Spivack, Washington-based reporter specializing in accountability stories

    Kolawole Talabi is an independent storyteller based in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Lee van der Voo, author

    Nancy West, New Hampshire based investigative reporter

    The Fund’s program of grant-making for domestic stories is supported by The Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, The Park Foundation, and The Gannett Foundation. Domestic and foreign projects are supported by The Reva and David Logan Foundation, The Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation and The Green Park Foundation. General support has been granted by The Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation, The Nara Fund, The Herb Block Foundation, and individual donors, many of them referred by the Catalogue for Philanthropy: Greater Washington.

    Pro bono legal services are provided by Dykema Gossett PLLC, a national commercial law firm with a broad portfolio of community service and pro bono clients.

    Pro bono business advisory services are provided by Leigh Riddick, Associate Professor of Finance at The American University’s Kogod School of Business.

    Fund for Investigative Journalism – Logan Fellows Announced

    April 16th, 2015

    (Washington) Four journalists whose work has been supported by the Fund for Investigative Journalism (FIJ) are headed next week to the 2015 Logan Symposium, hosted by the University of California Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism’s Investigative Reporting Program.

    Over the course of three days, invited journalists, academics, government officials, and philanthropists will hear presentations by new players in the field of investigative journalism – such as The Marshall Project, Gawker Media, BuzzFeed, and First Look Media – learn about innovative storytelling techniques, and discuss the state of nonprofit investigative reporting.

    A generous grant from the Reva and David Logan Foundation allowed the Fund for Investigative Journalism – Logan fellows to attend the 2015 Symposium.

    The Reva and David Logan Foundation, one of FIJ’s major supporters, also endowed a chair in investigative journalism at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, now held by Lowell Bergman.

    The Fund for Investigative Journalism – Logan fellows are:

    *Zahra Burton, founder of Global Reporters for the Caribbean, which reported on police shootings in the Dominican Republic with grant support from FIJ.

    *Karen Coates and Jerry Redfern, co-authors of Eternal Harvest, a book documenting the enduring hazards of bombs dropped over Laos by the American military during the Vietnam War. Those bombs are still exploding today, and have killed or injured more than 20,000 Laotian people since the end of the war. Coates and Redfern were supported by an FIJ grant.

    *Camila Osorio, a New York University graduate student whose FIJ-sponsored investigation will appear in both New York and Colombian news outlets.

    Park Foundation Supports Investigative Journalism Grants

    April 8th, 2015

    (Washington) The Fund for Investigative Journalism (FIJ) is pleased to announce that The Park Foundation has awarded $50,000 in support of FIJ’s grant-making program for independent investigative reporters. This marks the fifth year the Foundation has supported investigative projects screened and selected by FIJ’s board of directors.

    During the past year, with Park Foundation backing, reporters have exposed how rare it is for the federal government to prosecute corporate environmental crime, the pay-to-play culture connecting political money and government contractors in the District of Columbia, and the hazards of transporting explosive crude oil across America by train – along the country’s aging railroad tracks and trestles.

    The Park Foundation support helps underwrite FIJ’s program of grants for independent reporters who have the ideas, sources, and know-how to produce groundbreaking investigative journalism, but need help with travel and other expenses.

    Headquartered in Ithaca New York, The Park Foundation’s media program supports investigative journalism, public broadcasting programs, and documentaries. The Foundation also supports higher education, environmental causes, animal welfare, community needs and sustainability initiatives in and around Ithaca.