The Fund for Investigative Journalism

Supporting investigative reporting projects around the world

  • Next Application Deadline

    Monday May 22, 2017 - 11:59 pm (Eastern)
  • Boardman Elected to FIJ Board

    (Washington DC) – The Fund for Investigative Journalism announced today that David Boardman, dean of Temple University’s School of Media and Communication, has been elected to its Board of Directors.

    Previously, Boardman was executive editor of the Seattle Times, which he led to four Pulitzer Prizes for investigative reporting, breaking news, and national news.

    He is president of the American Society of News Editors, a member of the Steering Committee of the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, a member of the Board of Directors of the California-based Center for Investigative Reporting, and a charter member of the Advisory Board of ProPublica, the national investigative journalism nonprofit. He also serves on the board of the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project, based in Sarajevo, Bosnia.

    Boardman has also served as president of Investigative Reporters and Editors, a national professional development and membership organization of investigative reporters.

    He joins a board that also recently elected members Marcia Bullard, former President and Chief Executive Officer of USA WEEKEND, and Milton Coleman, retired Senior Editor of the Washington Post.

    Ricardo Sandoval-Palos, president of The Fund for Investigative Journalism’s board, praised Boardman for his contributions to journalism.

    “For decades David has been a source of inspiration for journalists who favor the deeper story, guiding a generation of investigative reporters toward effective ways of delivering important stories to evolving audiences. David’s experience and leadership will help FIJ remain a leader in the fight to keep investigative journalism alive and relevant.”

    For more than forty years the Fund for Investigative Journalism has paid reporting expenses of reporters who have the ideas, sources, and know-how to produce groundbreaking investigative journalism but lack the resources to complete their projects.

    In the past two years, the Fund has awarded more than $400,000 in investigative reporting grants. The typical grant is around $5,000.

    The Fund receives support from foundations and from individuals. Its foundation supporters are The Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation, The Park Foundation, The Reva & David Logan Foundation, The Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation, The Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation, The Gannett Foundation, The Green Park Foundation, and The Nara Fund.

    Pro bono legal services are provided by Dykema Gossett PLLC, a national commercial law firm with a broad portfolio of community service and pro bono clients.

    Pro bono business advisory services are provided by Leigh Riddick, Associate Professor of Professor of Finance at The American University’s Kogod School of Business.

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