The Fund for Investigative Journalism

Supporting investigative reporting projects around the world

  • Next Application Deadline

    To Be Announced
  • Robert I. Friedman Award

    Robert I. Friedman
    The Robert I. Friedman Award honors an investigative journalist whose work best exemplifies the talent, courage and reporting expertise of Robert I. Friedman, who died in 2002 at age 51. The $1,000 award will be given annually, at the discretion of the Board of the Fund for Investigative Journalism, to the best international reporting project or book completed in the previous calendar year with Fund support.

    In keeping with Friedman’s life and work, the award will be given to an investigative project focused outside the United States. Both U.S. and foreign-based reporters are eligible. The $1,000 Robert I. Friedman award will be in addition to any Fund grant previously given to the journalist for his or her international reporting project.
    There is no application process for the Friedman Award, and the award will be given solely at the discretion of the Board.


    The Career Of Robert I. Friedman

    A skilled and courageous award-winning journalist, Friedman worked primarily as a free-lance investigative reporter specializing in exposing international corruption and malfeasance. He died in July 2002 at age 51 as the result of a rare disease he contracted while in India working on a story about sexual slavery. That investigation was supported in part by a grant from the Fund.

    Friedman’s book on the activities of Russian mobsters in America, “Red Mafiya,” resulted in death threats that forced him and his wife, Christine Dugas, also a journalist, into hiding for a time. Friedman also wrote extensively about the radical right in Israel, including his books “Zealots for Zion: Inside Israel’s West Bank Settlement Movement” and “False Prophet,” a biography of Rabbi Meir Kahane.

    Click here to read a tribute to Friedman by his longtime friend and editor, Dan Bischoff. Click here to read a tribute to Friedman published by “The Nation” where he was a frequent contributor. And here is a tribute to Friedman by Micah Sifry, another friend and colleague. Sifry’s remarks were delivered at the initial screening of “The Day My God Died,” a documentary on child sexual slavery in India dedicated to Friedman.