The Fund for Investigative Journalism

Supporting investigative reporting projects around the world

  • Next Deadline: Feb. 4, 2019 (11:59 pm Eastern)

  • No Lawyers Allowed

    PrisonFrom Alisa Roth for Life of the Law: There are some places where defendants have no right to legal representation. Prison, for example.

    [Reporting sponsored by The Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation.]

    Photo credit: Nancy Mullane

    The Fight for Transgender Rights in Jail

    From Nicole Pasulka for BuzzFeed, the fight for respect for transgender people – in jail.

    [Reporting sponsored by The Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation.]

    Seeking Better Care for Texas Foster Kids

    Cortez-NeavelFrom Beth Cortez-Neavel for The Texas Observer, and the radio show Texas Standard, an investigation of the “highly dysfunctional” and severely underfunded mental health services that foster children are forced to rely upon in Texas.  Many who suffered childhood traumas receive inadequate treatment, with consequences that follow them through life.

    [Sponsored by The Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation.]

    Photo credit: Beth Cortez-Neavel

     

    FIJ Grants Awarded

    (Washington) – The Fund for Investigative Journalism (FIJ) has awarded $79,000 in grants to journalists working on 19 projects in the United States and around the world. With FIJ grants, journalists investigate abuse of power in the public and private sectors. The financial support helps freelancers and reporters working for nonprofit news organizations cover the necessary costs of document retrieval, travel to develop and interview sources, and rental fees for equipment used for multi-media story-telling. A typical grant is $5,000. FIJ grants may also include small stipends.

    The following reporters and organizations have been awarded grants: (more…)

    Oakland Police Misconduct

    occupyarrestFrom the team at Oakland Local, a comprehensive look at police accountability, using public records including civil court filings and judgments. The “Oakland Police Beat” database allows public access to original documents and data on wrongful deaths and other police misconduct.

    Photo credit: Elijah Nouvelage

    [Reporting sponsored by The Green Park Foundation.]

    Police Dishonesty Overturning Convictions

    sean ellis

    From Nancy West, for VTDigger, the story of how convictions are being overturned nationwide – sometimes after decades of imprisonment – because prosecutors failed to tell defendants that police officers testifying against them had a history of dishonesty or excessive force buried in confidential personnel files. There’s no way to know how many convicts are unaware they were denied their constitutional right to all favorable, material evidence against them.

    [Reporting sponsored by The Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation.]

    Photo: Sean Ellis is pictured with his attorneys at his bail hearing in Boston. A judge ordered a new trial for Ellis who spent 22 years in prison after being convicted of killing a Boston police detective. Courtesy of the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism, Brandeis University.

     

    The Chinese Military Connection to the Nicaragua Canal

    Santiago Villa, for Confidencial Magazine, investigates and connects the dots between the developer of the Nicaragua Canal and the Chinese military.

    [Reporting sponsored by The Reva and David Logan Foundation.]

     

    Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation Grant Supports Investigative Reporting

    (Washington) – The Fund for Investigative Journalism (FIJ) is pleased to announce that the Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation has renewed its support of FIJ’s grant-making program for a third year with a $30,000 donation.

    The Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation’s journalism program supports press freedom around the world and seeks to improve the quality of journalism through grants to American journalism schools and investigative reporting projects and websites. The Foundation also supports education, community arts, public health, and environmental projects.

    The grant made to FIJ will underwrite freelance reporters writing for American media outlets on both domestic and foreign issues.

    For more than forty years, FIJ has paid reporting expenses of reporters who have the ideas, sources, and know-how to produce groundbreaking investigative journalism but need resources to complete their projects.

    One of the Fund for Investigative Journalism’s board members, David Ottaway, also serves on the board of the Nicholas B. Ottaway Foundation.

    Trade Deal Fails Haitian Workers

    dominican_republic_cane_burnFrom Amy Bracken for Al Jazeera America, part one of an investigation of the working conditions for Haitians in the Dominican Republic. Conditions were supposed to improve under a trade deal between the U.S., the Dominican Republic, and five Central American countries. But Bracken documents a harsh life for Haitians working on the sugar plantations including excessive hours and unsanitary living conditions.

    A plantation owner tells Bracken there is little or no enforcement of labor standards: “No, they are not interested in how we’re treating the Haitians.”

    In Part Two, Bracken explains the cozy relationship between U. S. government officials and America’s sugar barons.

    [Reporting sponsored by The Reva and David Logan Foundation.]

    Gannett Foundation Renews Support of Investigative Journalism

    (Washington) The Fund for Investigative Journalism is pleased to announce it has received $15,000 in support from the Gannett Foundation to help underwrite the Fund’s grant-making program.

    For the past five years, The Gannett Foundation has provided support for investigative reporters working with grants from the Fund. Those reporters have exposed wrongdoing and abuse of power in the United States, including stories of the callous treatment of new mothers in prison, the psychological damage caused by solitary confinement, the prevalence of returning women soldiers afflicted by PTSD, and traffic stops that target Hispanic motorists.

    The Gannett Foundation is a corporate foundation supported by the Gannett Co., Inc., owner of USA TODAY.

    For more than four decades, the Fund has paid reporting expenses of reporters who have the ideas, sources, and know-how to produce groundbreaking investigative journalism but lack the resources to complete their projects.